Beer: It’ll Cure What Ales You

February 22, 2013 Op-Eds, Opinion

Home to the rare breed of iron pumping, Muscle Milk chugging superjocks, Alfond Sports Center is typically teeming with Smart Waters and a rainbow of energy drinks. It comes to no surprise that these sugary beverages are a front runner among athletes: chock full of replenishing electrolytes, popular brands such as Gatorade seem to be the go-to refreshment of exercise enthusiasts

The ever-popular sports drinks, however, may find themselves competing for consumer favoritism as new research opens the door for an alternative post-workout quencher: beer.

Although believed to dehydrate consumers, beer consists of 93% water; the source of its quenching qualities, however, is not in the unexpectedly high water content, but in the bubbles. The carbonation in beer arises from its high carbon dioxide content; a study at Granada University in Spain claimed the carbonation increases the retention rate of fluids within the body. When compared to consuming a bottle of water, the study claims beer can hydrate the body more efficiently than water.

To assure your body is properly replenished while upholding your coveted gym-rat reputation, grab a barbell and a brew.

For those engaging in Jillian Michaels-status training, the carbohydrates in beer replace those lost during exercise: prolonged workouts cause the body to burn through enough carbohydrates to reduce blood glucose levels. The drop hinders athletic performance by reducing energy levels and potentially triggering nausea and dizziness.

To assure your body is properly replenished while upholding your coveted gym-rat reputation, grab a barbell and a brew; the alcohol will even take the edge off those nagging muscle pains. Beneficial to athletes and academias alike, beer is essentially the college equivalent of gummy vitamins: a 12-ounce dark lager provides more vitamins and minerals than wine or hard liquor.

One of its main ingredients, yeast is vitamin B rich, while hops, the flavoring and stability agent in beer, provide a natural
source of protein with zero fat and cholesterol. It all comes down, however, to a matter of moderation and selection: a few IPAs keeps you hydrated at the gym, finishing off a 12 pack of Pabst makes you fat.

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