Obama vs. LGBT

March 17, 2011 Op-Eds, Opinion

President Barack Obama was the political icon for the LGBT community during the 2008 elections. However, not so long after these elections, the LGBT community’s heart was broken since Obama seemed to be outright neglecting the promises he made before being voted into office.

Neither Obama nor Vice President Joe Biden personally seem to be in support of homosexual marriage. Needless to say, the LGBT community is concerned and no doubt angry.

Did Obama appeal to the LGBT community in order to get elected, or has it placed too much confidence in the charismatic elect and held way too high expectations?

I think that LGBT marriage should not be a pressing issue, and people should just do what they want. I defend the LGBT lifestyle from a libertarian perspective and do not think it is “immoral,” as many on the stereotypical right label it, and see it rather as an example of how varied and clever human sexuality can get.

At the same time, however, I do not believe in indulging the LGBT community. The government, federal or otherwise, should not pass laws to benefit the LGBT community while trampling on others. I have more respect for the queer individual that can continue to be him or herself despite enduring the ignorant and bigoted population; I have less respect–if any–for the person who whines because nobody thinks his or her way and demands the government takes care of his or her own problems.

Too many members of the LGBT community expected their new political messiah to take care of everything. Electors who expected immediate results were not only disappointed that they did not receive what they wanted quickly but that it seemed as if Obama did not truly support the LGBT community.

My suggestion to them would be to see the solution in an individualist’s perspective instead of a collective. If I were a member of the LGBT community or otherwise not heterosexual, I would still have no need for an LGBT community or a queer group to protest with because my sexual orientation would mean something only to myself and of no real concern to others.

I would acknowledge that people would need to express their sexuality in their own way, rather than take the mindset that a whole section of society needs to benefit.

If I were a member of the LGBT community, I would prefer that I would be hated for what I truly am than force the rest of the world to like me. In a libertarian, individualistic political outlook, you would have such freedom and nobody can tell you otherwise.

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