Try the Diet With an Attitude

September 3, 2010 Arts & Entertainment

Have you ever really thought about what you eat? Not just count the calories on the back of the Special K box, but really dissect every ingredient added to create that delicious, yet surprisingly low-fat cereal you love so much? Probably not, unless you have some sort of food OCD or have read Rory Freedman and Kim Barnouin’s New York Times Best Seller, “Skinny Bitch.”

“Skinny Bitch” is a self proclaimed “No-nonsense, tough-love guide for savvy girls who want to stop eating crap and start looking fabulous.” The informational paperback begins with harsh criticisms of everything from smoking cigarettes to drinking the occasional beer. It supplies eye-opening factoids about the unknowingly dangerous chemicals lurking in our foods, and the absurd amount of hormones going unreported in our meat supply. The authors take a pretty fervent stance against the government’s inability to regulate the country’s food safety regulations and inform readers to disregard the USDA all together. They then give examples of organic food brands that their research has shown to be free of bad stuff.

The vitality of daily exercise is emphasized and the chapter about pooping provides some abnormal insight into the wonders of the human digestive system. The following chapters portray a primarily pro-vegan stance. PETA-esque tales of animal abuse undoubtedly shock the reader into paying attention to the author’s vast knowledge of how to live the veggie lifestyle and begin to reap the myriad of benefits.

The authors hold nothing back while dishing out the harsh truths about what to do in order to shed a few pounds. I gained information about the chemicals residing in the foods I eat on a daily basis. For example, I will not be using Splenda in my morning coffee because, while it may be low in fat, it contains the highly dangerous artificial sweetener, aspartame. Aspartame has been linked to causing cancer and blindness. Although many activists have tried for years to get aspartame off shelves, little to no progress has been made.

The authors start off sounding like sassy, foulmouthed members of the “Sex and the City” clique, hell-bent on keeping you away from Cheetos. Then, interesting facts steadily transform into a campaign for total vegan domination. The quotes from workers at meat plants and dairy farms are enough to make you vomit, cry, and never touch a cheeseburger again. I would describe it as propaganda geared towards scaring you vegan. The book is extreme, considering how difficult it is to eat a total organic diet of strictly vegan products specified in the back of the book. It felt like these women went from being my feisty best friends having a conversation with me over coffee to two disgruntled hippies who were about to set all the cows in the farm free in an effort to protest.

All in all, “Skinny Bitch” will have an immense impact on your life, whether it is as minuscule as reading labels to skipping food with labels all together. The book’s life style change may sound a little extreme, but a skinny bitch has to do what a skinny bitch has to do.

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