Mr. Rogers joins Netflix

November 12, 2015 Features

Netflix is currently streaming the show with more episodes to come.

The late alumni Fred Rogers’ television show Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood has found a new home on Netflix streaming. Mr. Rogers graduated from Rollins College in 1951.

The show, which originally aired on PBS, focuses on educating children about the world and the people in it. Mr. Rogers created, composed, and wrote the show that sparks imagination with journeys around his “neighborhood,” in which viewers learn about exciting new inventions, people, and works of art. Mr. Rogers also works to educate children on important moral values with his trips to the puppet kingdom of Make-Believe.

Mr. Rogers serves as the show’s host, always bringing a new idea or invention to share with his neighbors the viewers, but in typical Fred Rogers fashion, he never tries to overshadow any of his guests or extras on set. In his neighborhood everyone is equally important, and he treats all his neighbors to his iconic morality and soft-spoken personality.

What is incredible about this show is how impactful and innovative it was for its time. It aired new episodes from 1968 to 2001 and was able to address topics ranging from childhood disabilities to environmental issues—all at a level comprehensible to a preschool child.

The show also works to educate children through multiple mediums. Viewers are regularly treated to operas and taken on trips to learn about new forms of science, engineering, and music.

Mr. Rogers’ selflessness was not limited to the television. He spent a great deal of time at his summer home in Winter Park and would often visit the campus to meet with students and faculty. English Professor Dr. Maurice O’Sullivan recalls how Mr. Rogers helped with a prologue for a book of essays on teaching Shakespeare

“With his usual modesty, Fred said that he didn’t feel qualified and he hadn’t really written for a high school audience. But he agreed to do it as a favor and sat down for an interview with Stan and Alan Nordstrom,” said O’Sullivan.

“Since had had so many brilliant insights, I added a few Shakespearean quotes to the piece. He called me and said, ‘Socky, I need to cut the quotes out. They make me look as though I know more about Shakespeare than I do.’ That was the true modesty of the man.”

Netflix currently has 20 episodes from several seasons available to be streamed, and the service plans on adding more episodes over the next several months.

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