Gen Ed Requirements

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One of the most daunting aspects of college is drudging through the maze of general requirement classes.  These classes are mandatory to graduate but are often dreaded by students and incoming freshmen due to a reputation as being boring and irrelevant. Instead of being fun or engaging, Gen Ed’s have become a time in which students browse Rollins Confessions and text message under the table. Instead of dreading your classes, learn to enjoy them because many of the general requirement classes offered by Rollins removes students from a traditional classroom setting and immerses them into new environments.

When it comes to the P.E credit, a ton of classes guarantee unique ways to have fun and get active.  Instead of stepping into some 8 a.m. lecture; you can slip into a bathing suit and glide out on Lake Virginia. Rollins offers classes such as Sailing and Canoeing, Scuba, and even Paddle-boarding to fulfill the PE requirment. Some of these out door classes do demand that students pay an additional hundred dollars in order to participate. However, when I asked students if the price was worth it they all responded positively.   This additional fee is small and allows students to use equipment and travel off-campus for trips. A good example of this would be the Rollins scuba class which took students as far as the Cayman Islands to put their new scuba certification to good use.

If you are looking to fulfill an A credit, then you should try Improv 1: Fundamentals. This class allows students a creative outlet and the chance to develop skills that can be applied to their everyday lives.  When Improv students find themselves immersed in situations that are outside their immediate comfort zone, they use the skills they learned to respond on the spot and function well as part of a team. On top of all these skills the class is fun and a great way to escape the monotony of a classroom desk.

I should point out that not all desk classes should be avoided. Rollins offers a myriad of unique classes that take place in the traditional classroom setting and fill more than just one letter requirement.  One of my personal favorites is Cultural Anthropology, which I took in order to fill my C credit. The class topics are fascinating, taking students far back in history to embrace new ways of thinking and different cultures. After completing this credit I found myself looking at my college experience through a different light. This is a great class if you are looking for something to add into your schedule, and is not too demanding if you do the daily readings.

Now what about the fulfillment of your D credit? This seems to be the letter requirement that gets students frustrated, seeing as it’s focused on historical development. This means all too often that students are sucked into wordy, boring, classes. Here are a few options that may get you out of this loop. If you are a fan of art, try Intro to Art History. This class walks you through the development of Western Art and Architecture. Students watch art change through the ages and grow a new appreciation for something they may have no been exposed to before.  If you want something a bit further out of the box, Zombies, Serial Killers, and Madmen is always a winner. You will never be bored delving into everything from classic killers to the undead.

General Requirements are mandatory but here at Rollins we prove they can be fun. The best way to approach your own Gen Ed’s is to ask older peers and professors who are always prepared to give suggestions.  Meeting your general requirements should expand your worldview, not just be a burdensome task. Peer input can guide you to classes you never imagined that you would enjoy. After all, sometimes it is the studies that we expect to hate that change the course of our college careers and send us off in a new direction.

Alexandra Perry

About Alexandra Perry

Ali Perry '15 is Managing Editor at The Sandspur and studying English at Rollins College. Ali is also the Editor-in- Chief of Brushing, the Rollins College Literary Journal.

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