Security Update, Boiled Down

February 10, 2011 News

On Jan. 31, campus security came out with its 2010 Campus Security Report. Contrary to its name, the report covers the offenses from the 2009 calendar years, along with the Rollins College Missing Student Policy and the Environmental, Health, and Safety HEOA Compliance. Also included are Rollins’ fire safety protocols and its definitions of reportable crimes. The office is required to send out a report of this sort annually to comply with the Higher Education Act of 1965 and the Cleary Act.

The first few pages are dedicated to describing campus security, and how the team works. This includes their mission statement, information about the crime log, and the ways to report infractions. The booklet also provides information about their drug and alcohol policies. Three pages are dedicated to defining sexual assault, and how to report and prevent such issues.

At the end of the report, there is a section with crime statistics from 2007, 2008 and 2009. The chart displays the different types of offenses (including attempts) and the documented number of cases per year. An incident is considered documented in two forms, arrest and referral. The statistics are also divided into three subcategories based on their location: incidents on campus, incidents in a non-campus building, and incidents on public property. The first section of the chart deals with major offenses, such as: aggravated assault, robbery, hate crimes, etc. In 2009 there were incidents in four of these categories.

There were five forcible sex offenses documented in residential buildings on campus. This is less than both previous years, where there were seven documented cases in 2007, and nine in 2008. The other four categories are relatively small, with only one count of aggravated assault, one religious hate crime, and two counts of burglary. The section where Rollins really racks up the number of documented incidents in is the “select offenses” section. In just 2009, there were four arrests in residence halls for a violation of liquor laws.

This is dwarfed by the number of referrals, which came to a total of 336 in 2009. This is less than the number reported in 2008, which had 450 referrals, but almost three times more than 2007, which only saw 116 documented referrals. In 2009 there were 11 arrests concerning drug violations, and 28 referrals. Once again, 2008 had more incidents in both categories, and the 2009 year was on par with 2007. Unique to 2009 was a referral for a weapons law violation, documented in a residence hall.

The booklet ends with definitions of reportable crimes and other offenses. The reportable crimes — some of which are detailed to the right of this article— are: criminal homicide, forcible sex offenses, nonforcible sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft and arson; other offenses are liquor law violations, drug abuse violations, and weapon law violations.

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